Whurl Gurls: Meet Cory of @LuxieVintage

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I’m so excited to share a little interview with one of my favorite sellers on Whurl right now, Luxie Vintage! Aesthetically, Cory and I are extremely similar (like I thought that was me in her photo she sent me above, ha!) loving bright bold florals and 60’s collar details. But one thing I really adore about Cory’s shop is how she sells things from all decades for all types of people. She’s not just catering to her own tastes; you can tell she genuinely wants to find the perfect treasure for everyone out there! Check out some of her items on the Whurl app under “luxievintage” after you read through her interview below!

Where are you from? Born and raised in Phoenix, Arizona.

What inspires you? All of the powerful women in my life! They are lawyers, teachers, dancers, musicians, non-profit workers, fellow vintage sellers, welders, scientists, writers, fashionistas, store owners, photographers and on and on. I feel lucky as hell to be surrounded by such greatness. Sometimes I get to collaborate with them or just tag along while they’re working. Watching those babes in their element inspires me and motivates me to keep doing what I’m doing.


What’s your favorite decade? 1940s. The 60s are a close second place.

What’s your favorite place to vintage shop? Online! I rarely have time to do any personal shopping IRL 😦

What’s the best thing you ever thrifted? A super rare 1970s Los Angeles tattoo parlor shirt. It’s a bittersweet story but one of the most memorable, therefore I consider it one of the best things I ever thrifted. It was in 2012 when I had a brick & mortar vintage shop in Tempe, Arizona. I found the shirt at a thrift store for five dollars. I thought it was a 70s bowling league shirt, tagged it as so and sold it at my shop for $35. The person who bought the shirt off of me immediately told me they were almost positive that it was actually an extremely collectible shirt. That person was correct and ended up selling it on eBay for $1,200.00. At the time, it hurt to watch the auction creep up, but looking back, it taught me and important lesson: if you made a profit, be happy for the sale regardless of what the next person sells it for. That’s just the way of this sort of business. After selling vintage for twelve years, it’s something that I still have to remind myself. Ultimately, I made the profit I wanted off of the shirt. I should be happy for that, not resentful because the next person sold it for more. Ok, that sale still burns a little πŸ™‚

Name one fun fact about yourself: I’m absolutely terrified of E.T. Not so fun of a fact for me, but it seems to be a super fun fact for everyone who knows me.

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